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"What are the bells ringing for?"

The cultural activist Seyed Ahad Mikaeilzadeh, who is also head of the Public Relations and Information Center of 16th Resistance International Film Festival, in a noted entitled "What are the bells ringing for?" wrote the idea that a cultural commodity is non-functional is almost impossible.
The script of the note is as follows:

In fact, most festivals are puzzles of a larger set that are defined in the economic, political, social and cultural contexts of that community.
All the festivals of the world try to support their own currents of thoughts. It is also natural that they want to bold their thoughts. Basically, most of the world's leading festivals are known for promoting certain schools of thought.
In other words, these festivals, in addition to the seemingly cultural goals seen in their slogans, seek other purposes and in many cases do not hesitate to publish it in the media. If we think of festivals as a place of cultural interaction-which usually attracts a lot of attention-we must think of a function for it, like any other cultural or non-cultural commodity. 
The notion that a cultural commodity is useless, is almost impossible. In fact, most festivals are puzzles of a larger set that are defined in the economic, political, social and cultural contexts of that community. These "different definitions" have given rise to different and sometimes even contradictory views.
"Modeling" is the first thing that the world's major festivals do by awarding various prizes to specific films they support. A policy that is applied all over the world and more or less has its own supporters.
This year, the 16th Resistance Film Festival is trying to model its approaches in this field by awarding the grand prize of the festival in line with the goals of this cultural event.
The award, which has the title "Film in the Absolute Meaning" on its forehead, will probably be one of the sections full of discussion, news and analysis of the festival in various media, which will be mostly due to the title of this section.
But what the director of the "Film in the Absolute Meaning" section of the 16th Film Festival thinks was: "the most important issue in this section is the ratio of productivity to film costs."
"In fact, this section seeks to introduce a film that has a higher productivity-to-economy ratio and, given the costs incurred, leave the greatest impact on the audience."

These speeches of Nasser Bakideh highlighted the hypotheses that in fact the dominant view in this section is the attractiveness of works for people and their impact, regardless of the usual slogans and clichés, and in a word, attention to "wants", "interests" and "tastes" of people.
On the other hand, in this section, the amount of cost of the works has been taken into account.
By this definition, a short film with a principled and calculated structure (to which the audience also belongs) may be considered as wider or more than a feature film, which is usually much more expensive and energetic. 
As Bakideh further explained in this section, the chosen format in the absolute sense may be short, long and even documented, and in this respect there is no order.
What can be seen in Bakideh's speeches, in addition to matching the form and content of the work with economic issues, is the impact and attractiveness on the audience, which is what the audience expects to see significant works in this section.
What can be seen in Bakideh's speeches, is the impact and attractiveness on the audience, which is what the audience expects to see significant works in this section.
Paying attention to the neglected aspects such as "cost of operation" and "taste of the audience" brings appeal to the masses (in a medium like cinema whose nature is costly art and its impact on the masses is undeniable) makes this award more tangible.